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Mollymaude
True Blue Farmgirl

92 Posts

Vickie
San Angelo TX
USA
92 Posts

Posted - Jul 26 2010 :  08:05:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A couple of years ago on Spring break I took my grandchildren to Fredericksburg Texas as part of our annual Spring break trip. There I was delighted to find, at the Pioneer Museum, soap making, blacksmithing, spinning, barbwire fence making/repair, and a multitude of other "lost art". Not only were the skills being demonstrated but they allowed the children that wanted to participate to actually do hands on.
A few weeks ago my oldest son (36 yrs old) found an area of wild plums. He picked a few in a paper sack and brought them over and asked if I would be interested in going to pick with him and his children as he remembers us picking wild plums and making jelly when he was young. I loaded up with him and my two grandchildren (8 & 10 yrs) and away we went. Hanging over a little bridge reaching for the outlying plums and crawling all over and under the brush to get them. What fun we had and my kids and grandkids were delighted to receive the beautiful plum jelly I made from our efforts.
Opportunities still exist but we have to search for them and make sure our families/friends continue to long for those experiences.

Life is full of special surprises
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Mollymaude
True Blue Farmgirl

92 Posts

Vickie
San Angelo TX
USA
92 Posts

Posted - Jul 26 2010 :  08:08:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Beth,

Can you tell me more about hairpin lace? I have not ever heard of it.

Vickie

Life is full of special surprises
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sunshine
True Blue Farmgirl

4877 Posts

Wendy
Utah
USA
4877 Posts

Posted - Jul 27 2010 :  06:05:16 AM  Show Profile  Send sunshine a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
hair pin lave is easy to make using a fork ( hair pin fork or how days you can buy a hair pin lace tool at your local hobby store) you wind thread around the tines the bigger teh space on the tine the wider teh lace each time you get back tot he center of the space between the times you make a single crochet there are lots of people who still do hand work and lots of it my blog is full of old crafts and skills.


follow this link and you can see a fork and some books on the subject.
http://www.anniesattic.com/list.html?criteria=hairpin+lace&go.x=0&go.y=0

Just an FYI you can always make your own loom out of a bent wire hanger if you have one alot of people don't anymore because of plastic hangers

have a lovely day and may God bless you and keep you safe
Farmgirl Sister #115
my blog http://sunshinescreations.vintagethreads.com/
my store http://www.etsy.com/shop/VintageThreads
facebook http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Sunshines-Creations/104230882941628

Edited by - sunshine on Jul 27 2010 06:06:27 AM
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Jennie
Farmgirl at Heart

7 Posts

Jennifer Robin
Olympic Peninsula, Washington
7 Posts

Posted - Aug 09 2010 :  7:29:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does anyone remember invisible mending? My mom used to send our nicer (but damaged) clothing off to a lady who could work wonders; you couldn't even find evidence of the rips or holes anymore when she was finished, and it wasn't terribly expensive to have done either. FIt in very well with the good old "use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without" mentality. When our daughter was born 30 years ago, I had an antique christening gown that needed some repairs, and I remember that, back then, invisible mending had it's own category in the yellow pages!

Jennifer Robin
http://robinswoods.blogspot.com/
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classygram
True Blue Farmgirl

1812 Posts

Brenda
Pleasant Hill Mo.
USA
1812 Posts

Posted - Aug 11 2010 :  07:09:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When my son was in high school every summer he would work putting up hay. Hot and hard work but it kept him in shape for sports and gave him some extra money. I don't hear of teens putting up hay anymore.

Hugs, Brenda

"What lies behind us, and what lies before us are small matter compared to what lies within us."
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Seek reasons to Love..In every sigment of everyday-look for something that brings forth within you a feeling of Love-Abraham Hicks
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sunshine
True Blue Farmgirl

4877 Posts

Wendy
Utah
USA
4877 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2010 :  08:05:28 AM  Show Profile  Send sunshine a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Some nice dry cleaners still do invisible mending I know I had my husbands suit fixed two years ago by a dry cleaner who still offered that service. Cost a lot though but so did the suit so it was cheaper to fix it this way and you couldn't find the hole when done.

There are lots of seamstress and sewing machine repairmen in my area as for candle makers and blacks smiths I know quiet a few as well as book makers and things I think it is more the circles a person floats in that let you know these are not lost arts.

To be honest that term is bugging me. Most things are not lost arts most people just are not aware of what goes on in their community as people do most things in their homes with the doors closed. I have a neighbor who was looking on the internet to find someone who does repairs on antiques and things (quilts and fabric) and found me through my blog she was excited to find someone in her town as she was going through the blog said wait I know those kids and realized it was me her neighbor. If you belong to hand guilds you will know tons of people in these fields and they will know tons in related fields and so on. They are not dieing arts they are only dieing and lost arts if you choose them to be. Sorry for the rant but I hate when people say like "oh that is a dyeing art" then I say really I know at least 40 or more people who do this so it can be that dying if one person knows so many others

have a lovely day and may God bless you and keep you safe
Farmgirl Sister #115
my blog http://sunshinescreations.vintagethreads.com/
my store http://www.etsy.com/shop/VintageThreads
facebook http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Sunshines-Creations/104230882941628

Edited by - sunshine on Aug 12 2010 08:52:14 AM
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MagnoliaWhisper
True Blue Farmgirl

2817 Posts

Heather
Haysville Kansas
USA
2817 Posts

Posted - Aug 18 2010 :  12:29:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jennifer my native american grandmother picked cotton for a penny a day back in the 1930's, in Arkansas, it's back breaking work.

I do wish though that prejudice would be left off the board. I happen to be of mexican decent. My mexican great grandmother worked very hard alongside her mentally challenged daughter for 50 cents a hour back in the 1980's. I really don't think any "americans" would of done the work she did for basically 25 cents a hour (her and my aunt together got 50 cents a hour). Unless you are 100% native american we are all aliens here any way! lol Thank goodness my parents raised me with christian belief's to love every one no matter what country of origin they came from. Even when it wasn't popular they adopted 6 children from Haiti, back then people balked at them and asked why they would adopt black children from Haiti......thankfully it now looks like a lot of the worlds thinking on that has changed.


http://www.heathersprairie.blogspot.com
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soleil
True Blue Farmgirl

68 Posts

Linda
Butternut WI
USA
68 Posts

Posted - Aug 18 2010 :  2:37:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wendy, I think alot of why you see so many of the old "home" arts has to do with the area you live in. I don't consider them lost as much as, in many instances, forgotten. Many mothers, fathers, grandparents, are too busy in our high tech world. My grandkids come to visit and they have to leave their phones, ipods, gameboys, etc. at home. (Not that we don't own them ourselves! They are just not all consuming.)) We have so much fun experimenting with these not so often done activities.
Several years ago after one too many times hearing, "Oh, you do lots of crafts!" I decided I needed to come up with a more suitable title for what I do. After much thought, I decided I'm a "Primitive Domestic Artist". I myself teach or have taught many of the early homemaking arts and try to keep them alive.

Blessed be,*´¨)
¸.·´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*¨)
(¸.·´ (¸.·´ * soleil

Even as we dream, we begin to succeed...even as we succeed, we begin to dream again.
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carolj
True Blue Farmgirl

244 Posts

Carol
Waynesboro Georgia
USA
244 Posts

Posted - Aug 21 2010 :  08:22:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Shoe repair. There used to be a shoe repair shop in every town, no matter the size.

I just realized, partly due to Mary Jane's article on the mill, that the reason old buildings and machinery are so beautiful is because they were built to last. No the powers that be actually plan obsolescence. So sad for those who embrace all things new.
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Pasthyme
True Blue Farmgirl

99 Posts

Gail
Mountain View AR
99 Posts

Posted - Mar 14 2011 :  07:58:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am very fortunate to work at the Ozark Folk Center in Mountain View, Arkansas. Part of our mission statement is to 'preserve and perpetuate' the old time traditional ways. We have a craft village, where I sew old time style clothing using a treadle machine. We have many skilled crafters who demonstrate their skills, sell their wares, and teach others the craft. We also keep the old time music going.
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Rejena
True Blue Farmgirl

149 Posts

Rejena
WY
USA
149 Posts

Posted - Mar 14 2011 :  08:08:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi everyone. I really like this thread. We are VERY strongly encouraging our children in learning a trade. Tim is going to be 14 this summer and has been blacksmithing since he was 11. It is pretty AWESOME. He's got a passion for it and we are so happy for him. We were hoping he'd head towards being a farrier, but he's decided he really doesn't like horses.

Sydnee finds herself driven towards all the things domestic. It is so much fun to see her blossom and see where she is headed.

We are all raising animals and that is also such an important part of our educational opportunities we share.

Again, thanks for sharing everyone. I am going to share this tread with the kids.

www.violetacresfarm.com
"Kid Run Boer Goat Farm"
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sunshine
True Blue Farmgirl

4877 Posts

Wendy
Utah
USA
4877 Posts

Posted - Mar 14 2011 :  08:21:50 AM  Show Profile  Send sunshine a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
i want to work in a place like that someday
quote:
Originally posted by Pasthyme

I am very fortunate to work at the Ozark Folk Center in Mountain View, Arkansas. Part of our mission statement is to 'preserve and perpetuate' the old time traditional ways. We have a craft village, where I sew old time style clothing using a treadle machine. We have many skilled crafters who demonstrate their skills, sell their wares, and teach others the craft. We also keep the old time music going.



have a lovely day and may God bless you and keep you safe
Farmgirl Sister #115
my blog http://sunshinescreations.vintagethreads.com/
my store http://www.etsy.com/shop/VintageThreads
facebook http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Sunshines-Creations/104230882941628
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Marybeth
True Blue Farmgirl

6418 Posts

Mary Beth
Stanwood Wa 98292
USA
6418 Posts

Posted - Mar 14 2011 :  10:12:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I kinda agree with Sunshine. the knowledge and the people are there doing the work. We--as lazy people--just need to find them. Amazing that one could have a neighbor who didn't even know what you did. I guess since I live in a small town and an ag area we have a great mix of jobs and enough for workers--large and small. My granddaughter cleans stall at a barn after school. My late husband was a horseshoes---our shoer now is a extremely handy female. So wake up and look around you---you may be surprised. MB

http://www.smallcityscenes.blogspot.com
www.day4plus.blogspot.com

"Life may not be the party we hoped for...but while we are here we might as well dance!"
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Lady Woodworker
True Blue Farmgirl

259 Posts

Karen
Chamberlain Maine
USA
259 Posts

Posted - Mar 14 2011 :  4:19:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great thread!

I trained to be a wooden boat builder and a furniture maker. Both are withering trades for sure.

There's a joke about boat building that goes:
How do you make a million dollars building boats? Start with two million! LOL

Seriously though, I have found satisfaction and some good jobs building boats, esoteric as it is.
Nowadays, I work for a magazine that is dedicated to wooden boats and how to build and preserve them.
The more I learn, the more deeply I appreciate and try to learn the old ways of doing things-- for boats, furniture, and other aspects of my life.

I agree with Wendy that it would be nice to work at a place like the Ozark Folk Center. I have been lucky enough to teach workshops at similar-type schools. They are wonderful places.
Gail, I may come 'a knockin' at your door someday!

Rejena, I commend you for encouraging your children to pursue a trade. My college friends can sometimes wait months or even years for work.
I always have a job. You are giving your children a wonderful gift. I have not been fortunate enough to have children but if I did, I'd like to imagine that my kids would have a trade and be able to care for animals--the skills your children will have. What a great life!

Mary Beth is right. Trades are all around us.

And, while I can't argue against going to school, you can go a long way and have a lot of fun with trades as hobbies too. Nothing wrong with that--

Karen


Farmgirl Sister # 2419
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brightmeadow
True Blue Farmgirl

2040 Posts

Brenda
Ray Township Michigan
USA
2040 Posts

Posted - Mar 16 2011 :  3:36:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I belong to a machine-knitting guild. Home knitting machines were invented in the 1800's and were very popular in Japan and the US during the 60's and 70's but now there seem to be fewer and fewer people who know about the craft, and most of the people who attend the seminars and conferences are close to a generation older than me.

Knitting on a machine is a lot like weaving on a loom. It takes different skills and traits than hand-knitting, but you end up with similar results.. only a little quicker.

I've subscribed to several magazines and journals about the subject over the last 30 years-- and I would say that journalists who write about machine knitting are even in more danger of extinction than the machine-knitters themselves.

The last one to give up publishing a magazine was Mary Anne Oger (from Canada) she is now writing a monthly column on the subject in "Knit 'n Style", check it out.

Knitting machines can often be found in estate sales or from a local guild, if you are interested.



You shall eat the fruit of the labor of your hands - You shall be happy and it shall be well with you. -Psalm 128.2
Visit my blog at http://brightmeadowfarms.blogspot.com ,web site store at http://www.watkinsonline.com/fish or my homepage at http://home.earthlink.net/~brightmeadow
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Rosemary
True Blue Farmgirl

1820 Posts


Virginia
USA
1820 Posts

Posted - Mar 17 2011 :  7:38:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Every single thing y'all are mentioning as dead or dying arts/crafts/trades are alive and well where I live! Recently, a young friend of mine (who, I remember, once wanted to apprentice with a famous artisan blacksmith in the County) even said her boyfriend is studying to become a farrier -- so there's a forge in her future after all! :-)

Something no one's mentioned yet are music skills, and the pleasant voices people are more likely to have when they make a habit of singing. Have you ever noticed that recently, people (especially women, I'm sorry to say) have more monotonous, nasal, and/or gravelly voices? Some of the people on radio and TV, I can barely stand to listen to -- and they're professionals! My husband (who is a musician) thinks it's because we don't have music in public schools so much any more. People's throats have tightened up -- and I'm sure stress has something to do with that, too. Where I live, music is alive and well in school, churches, open mic nights for teens and so on. And for the most part, people around here have nice speaking voices. I'm sure there's a connection. Oh listen to me rambling! Sorry, girls :-)
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graciegreeneyes
True Blue Farmgirl

3107 Posts

Amy Grace
Rosalia WA
USA
3107 Posts

Posted - Mar 19 2011 :  08:43:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's an interesting thought Mara - music used to be much more a part of everyday life, the making of it anyway. I sooo miss being part of a choir - my living so far from town puts a damper on being in the church choir. But it used to be more of a whole community activity - remember when Almanzo was courting Laura and they went to "choir classes"?
Every post on here reminds me of a little something we have lost - I think though, at some point, things are going to turn and those who have practiced at least some of these arts are going to have an advantage for sure!!
Amy Grace

Farmgirl #224
"use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without"
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maggimae
Farmgirl at Heart

1 Posts

Margaret
Lakeport Ca
USA
1 Posts

Posted - Mar 21 2011 :  11:46:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sad but true, a lot of makes up our history and how people used to live is gone by the way side! My grandson is a teenager and he loves to work with wood and is very talented. I encourage him to do anything with his hands that makes happy and that he may be able to fall back on in times when high tech jobs fall apart! I'm a childcare provider and have been for 22 years but so many folks are out of work in our small area that my business is drying up fast! We need to stress the importance of not letting all the old skills fade away!
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FebruaryViolet
True Blue Farmgirl

4810 Posts

Jonni
Elsmere Kentucky
USA
4810 Posts

Posted - Mar 21 2011 :  11:53:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Marybeth

......My late husband was a horseshoes---our shoer now is a extremely handy female. So wake up and look around you---you may be surprised. MB



Mary Beth, since I grew up around horses, my daddy being a jockey, I've always loved cleaning out stalls and holding feet for shoeing. Did it EVERY summer for money. I recently looked into farrier school in Lexington, Kentucky (horse central). I could do it, but I'd have to quit my regular job in order to attend the 12 week session. That's tough to do when you have a family...but I'd sure love it.


Musings from our family in the Bluegrass http://sweetvioletmae.blogspot.com/
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Lady Woodworker
True Blue Farmgirl

259 Posts

Karen
Chamberlain Maine
USA
259 Posts

Posted - Mar 22 2011 :  6:36:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dear Jonni,

I so admire that you want to become a farrier. I thought seriously about that a couple years ago and I learned some things about shoeing--and shoeing schools. For me though, it's really a bit late in life and, while I'm physically pretty fit, I don't think I have the strength to do that--day in and day out. But if you can do it, more power to you. Being a farrier is such an admirable trade, I think. Imagine being to help horses in such a profound way! I hope your life opens up in such a way that you can pursue it someday.
Good, good for you for wanting to!

Karen


Farmgirl Sister # 2419
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jackie v
Farmgirl in Training

32 Posts

jackie
easthampton ma
USA
32 Posts

Posted - Mar 23 2011 :  4:32:35 PM  Show Profile  Send jackie v a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I wonder if the state of the economy will "force" these skills and trades to re-emerge. I mean..we all have essential things to live..clothes,food,shelter,etc...Sure we can keep sending all our manufacturing overseas (another hot topic!) but eventually people will get sick of paying out their hard earned money for cheap inferior product. I can guarantee that the shirt that I made will last 10 times longer then the shirt that I bought at Wally World for $8.
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Lady Woodworker
True Blue Farmgirl

259 Posts

Karen
Chamberlain Maine
USA
259 Posts

Posted - Mar 23 2011 :  5:53:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Jackie I think you're on to something,

Yes, it could well cause a Renaissance of old ways. In fact, I think it is slowly coming to pass.
That would be a nice silver lining to all our economic woes, wouldn't it be?

Also, I think it is causing people to look for quality in all things (you touched on this too). I have based a big part of my woodworking career on the bet that more and more people would come to discern and to desire quality over quantity and cheapness. So far, it's worked out reasonably well for me.

A friend of mine owns a kitchen store and she has recently expanded to a second location. Puzzled and amazed I asked her how she did it--especially in these times. She said that mostly she stuck to her habit of stocking high quality products rather than reacting and trying to carry a lot of inexpensive gadgets that people might buy on impulse. Her business is thriving.

And beyond making and buying and trading for things,
this kind of thinking extends to other parts of our lives.
We look for better experiences and greater purpose.

Thanks for the wonderful topic!
Karen





Farmgirl Sister # 2419
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walkinwalkoutcattle
True Blue Farmgirl

1675 Posts

Megan
Paint Lick KY
USA
1675 Posts

Posted - Mar 24 2011 :  03:20:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Karen, I work next to a man named Don Weber, a woodwoorker who uses very primitive tools to make his pieces, and i applaud your skill!!! It's amazing to watch woodworkers in action.

Farmgirl #2879 :)
Starbucks and sushi to green fried tomatoes and corn pudding-I wouldn't change it for the world.
www.cattleandcupcakes.blogspot.com
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Lady Woodworker
True Blue Farmgirl

259 Posts

Karen
Chamberlain Maine
USA
259 Posts

Posted - Mar 25 2011 :  06:56:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Megan,

What a small world. I KNOW Don (by phone and email). I recently worked with him. I was his editor when he wrote an article for the magazine I work for. He is amazing. He wrote an article for us about his Viking tool chest. Don possesses a treasure-trove of artisan skills. You're very lucky to be his neighbor, I think. Do you do that kind of work too?
By the way, what a wonderful-sounding town. Who wouldn't want to live in a place called Paint Lick, Kentucky?

Please tell Don that Karen Wales said hello!

Best,

Karen

Farmgirl Sister # 2419
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cynfullypurple
True Blue Farmgirl

190 Posts

Cynthia
Endwell NY
USA
190 Posts

Posted - Apr 02 2011 :  1:35:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just had a 1935-38 Singer sewing machine restored from the only guy left in my area that does this type of thing. He says he has customers from ALL over the out lying areas that bring there machines in to be serviced. He says he even works with the Amish to repair their treadle machines. When he took my machine in he told me he had 38 machines ahead of mine! His family has been doing this for 85 years and he's the last in line. They used to have 3 shops throughout this area, but are now just down to the one with only one other person working with him.

As for librarians, I could only wish there weren't so many of us! There are plenty of schools out there that offer MSLIS degrees, especially now that we have the Internet and many of the programs are done online. I got mine from Syracuse University and did it pretty much online. The problem is there aren't enough people retiring as was expected before the economic fall out in 08. Those that would have retired can not afford to and even if they do a lot of public libraries are not replacing the librarians that retire. We had 3 retire from one of our public libraries in the area and the YA librarian left for Nevada and they won't replace any of them due to a hiring freeze. Also, for every job I apply to I've been told that there are anywhere from 60-80 + people applying for the same job. It is so discouraging, because I worked so hard to get my degrees thinking I would finally be able to take care of myself and my son. I worked one year in a middle school library, but got let go due to budget cuts:(

Have to say I was half tempted to ask the sewing machine guy if he would teach me the trade, as he seems pretty busy:)

"I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."

Farmgirl #2817
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