MaryJanesFarm Farmgirl Connection
Join in ... sign up
 
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password        REGISTER
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Books
 Book Ideas
 Endangered Arts & Professions
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Book Ideas: Previous Topic Endangered Arts & Professions Next Topic
Page: of 5

JenniferJuniper
True Blue Farmgirl

359 Posts

Jennifer
New Hampshire
USA
359 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2010 :  09:06:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'd like to see something on lost arts or jobs that are still essential but people do not go into anymore, and which skills may die off. Career counselors are all about cranking out IT professionals, business majors, lawyers etc. But I have never heard of one suggesting a 20-something become a farrier, midwife, watch repairer, barrel maker, and other low-tech fields.

I have read the Foxfire series with great interest for this reason.

Farmgirl Sister #204

melody
True Blue Farmgirl

3236 Posts

Melody
The Great North Woods in the Land of Hiawatha
USA
3236 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2010 :  1:25:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I know why----No money! And my goodness the liability of midwifery?

Times have changed sad but true...

I have often felt that I was born in the wrong century---I would have loved to have been a soap-maker waaaay back when, even though my business now is soap-making I would have loved to have had my little parlor shop around 1860!!

Melody
Farmgirl #525
www.melodynotes-melodynotes.blogspot.com
http://www.farmgirlhistory.blogspot.com/
www.lemonverbenasoap.etsy.com
www.longtallsallys.etsy.com
Go to Top of Page

2quilter
True Blue Farmgirl

127 Posts

Patricia
Greenwood IN
USA
127 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2010 :  5:05:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
blacksmithing. Nobody does blacksmithing anymore...lost art....

When life hands you scraps, make quilts!
Go to Top of Page

graciegreeneyes
True Blue Farmgirl

3107 Posts

Amy Grace
Rosalia WA
USA
3107 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2010 :  6:29:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Funny - I was just reading a book that touched on this. It was talking about the number of skid row residents that were now-unemployed ranch and farm hands, older fellows with skills that were no longer needed. Back when we had mostly family ranches and farms they had a place, but no more. They would have had skills to do all kind of things.
Amy Grace

Farmgirl #224
"use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without"
Go to Top of Page

Bonnie Ellis
True Blue Farmgirl

2407 Posts

Bonnie
Minneapolis Minnesota
USA
2407 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2010 :  6:40:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More lost arts: mending, pie baking by hand, repairing anything (self destruction built in most new stuff) being a mom (not available to couples needing both incomes). There are many more. Bonnie

grandmother and orphan farmgirl
Go to Top of Page

Turtlemoon
Farmgirl Legend Schoolmarm

378 Posts

Tanya
Port Orchard Washington
USA
378 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2010 :  7:21:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That would be an interesting article. I have worked numerous jobs, some in role playing museum's where the act of survival caused proficiency in many fields, some that were actual careers, now lost.

...life is what you make it!
Go to Top of Page

Lessie Louise
True Blue Farmgirl

1406 Posts

Carol
PECULIAR MO
USA
1406 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2010 :  06:34:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have noticed midwifery on the rise, for which I am grateful. More midwife's I think are delivering in the hospital but I have visited with with lay midwives also. It is so fustrating that not only do companies make things that can't be repaired, people don't want to take the time to fix them. Our local clock repairman can't find some one to teach his trade to.

Forget buns of steel, I'd rather have buns of cinnamon!
Don't out smart your common sense!!
Farmgirl #680!
Go to Top of Page

marjean
True Blue Farmgirl

3783 Posts

Marsha
Deltona FL
USA
3783 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2010 :  08:46:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My DH is a handyman, remodeler and can fix anything. His father collected watches and he can take them apart and repair and old clocks. I should make him a blog so people could send him their clocks and stuff that needs fixing. He has made things for companies that would have cost them thousands of dollars for just a few hundred. He also knows how to save people money on car repairs and so many other things.
I've been trying to figure out how to market his expertise but havn't had any success on craigslist and other free classified places.
Any ideas on how I could get the word out about him??
Mostly our friends do word of mouth and that keeps us afloat financially.
For instance our neighbors truck a/c went out and a belt so he called my DH and they are bartering some parts we needed on our Jeep for the work he will do for him. Then he has a house his mother just bought for investment for him to fix-up. So that is how it usually goes with him.
Then a girl that knows him through her father called and her friends car needs fixing and they wanted an honest mechanic. And the list goes on.lol

Farmgirl sister #308
handmade cards, vintage organizer bags and more at www.jeanpatchbymk.etsy.com
http://jeanpatch.blogspot.com
www.fullerdirect.com
id#0920150
www.watkinsonline.com/rjaramillo
Go to Top of Page

FebruaryViolet
True Blue Farmgirl

4810 Posts

Jonni
Elsmere Kentucky
USA
4810 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2010 :  08:59:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More...upholsterers, seamstresses, hoof trimmers (cattle), cabinet makers, weavers/textile manufacturers (small scale).

I am thinking of folks that I utilize for these services that some of you have mentioned. For watch repair (mostly my husband's 1940 Bulova), I use an estate jeweler in a small river town, nearby. I don't need a farrier because I don't have horses, but I do see them weekly when driving through the county--and, growing up in the racing industry, there's a farrier every 10 or so folks...
Barrel making is still an industry here, in Kentucky (bourbon is aged in barrels) and on the West Coast where vineyards utilize them.




Musings from our family in the Bluegrass http://sweetvioletmae.blogspot.com/
Go to Top of Page

FebruaryViolet
True Blue Farmgirl

4810 Posts

Jonni
Elsmere Kentucky
USA
4810 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2010 :  09:02:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh! Stationers, too. There are small boutique fine stationers popping up, but only people who actually value the handwritten, quality paper correspondence will spend the $$$.

Stonemasons/Rock Wall layers--For our anniversary, I am enrolling my dh in the Stone Conservancy (of Kentucky)'s class on laying rock walls, like the ones you see lining so many of our Kentucky roadways. They were made by the Irish, and is a VERY forgotten trade with the inception of wood and vinyl fencing for both home and agricultural use.


Musings from our family in the Bluegrass http://sweetvioletmae.blogspot.com/
Go to Top of Page

Lessie Louise
True Blue Farmgirl

1406 Posts

Carol
PECULIAR MO
USA
1406 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2010 :  11:00:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My SIL lives in New Jersey, and in her neighborhood, they hire a lot of handymen. She has a guy come in once or twice a year to do minor house repairs and change light bulbs. She feels that they are too busy (and important) to be bothered by these chores. I told my son he needs to find a rich neighborhood and put up some signs.....



Forget buns of steel, I'd rather have buns of cinnamon!
Don't out smart your common sense!!
Farmgirl #680!
Go to Top of Page

graciegreeneyes
True Blue Farmgirl

3107 Posts

Amy Grace
Rosalia WA
USA
3107 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2010 :  6:51:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gosh I just shudder to think what would become of us if all of this knowledge got lost - same with growing your own food. People used to just know things, like how to build a house. We would be a very helpless, albeit materially wealthy, society. I'd rather have the knowledge personally
Amy Grace

Farmgirl #224
"use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without"
Go to Top of Page

Faransgirl
True Blue Farmgirl

895 Posts

Beth
Houston Texas
USA
895 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2010 :  08:49:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How about Librarians. My daughter is studying now to be a Librarian but she goes to the only college in Texas that still does a degree in Library Science. She has students in her classes from almost every state. Four years ago when she started there were 8 colleges in Texas that offered that degree now there is only the one. She had to change colleges because the one she was going to dropped the course study. My Mom makes hairpin lace and she is the only person I have ever met that does. I have learned how, I don't enjoy it but I could pass on the skill if any of my daughters wanted to learn.

Farmgirl Sister 572

When manure happens just say "WOO HOO Fertilizer".
Go to Top of Page

Amie C.
True Blue Farmgirl

2099 Posts


Finger Lakes Region NY
2099 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2010 :  10:26:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's funny, Beth. I know at least three people who have left the workforce and gone back to school for library science in the past few years. Might be regional staffing needs playing a part. How about dressmakers? I've been trying to find some nice summer clothes and I sure wish it was possible to have a dress made or altered to fit.
Go to Top of Page

Betty J.
True Blue Farmgirl

1348 Posts

Betty
Pasco WA
USA
1348 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2010 :  10:36:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gracie, think of the times when our teenagers (me included) picked fruit (raspberries, strawberries, tree fruit, etc.) for summer work. There was decent money (for the time) in that, even though it was very hard work. I enjoyed getting away from the usual babysitting my brother and sister and working alongside someone my own age, plus the added benefit of having good fruit to eat. Now all the labor is imported and lots of other jobs are exported!

Betty in Pasco
Go to Top of Page

Faransgirl
True Blue Farmgirl

895 Posts

Beth
Houston Texas
USA
895 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2010 :  7:20:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Now all the fruit, veggies etc are picked by illegal aliens. Those jobs could still go to the teens if they weren't already taken. That is how it is in Texas anyway.

Farmgirl Sister 572

When manure happens just say "WOO HOO Fertilizer".
Go to Top of Page

MagnoliaWhisper
True Blue Farmgirl

2817 Posts

Heather
Haysville Kansas
USA
2817 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2010 :  11:50:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hmm, I don't think a whole lot of teens would do it for the pay that the illegal aliens get. Most would bulk at it.


http://www.heathersprairie.blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page

graciegreeneyes
True Blue Farmgirl

3107 Posts

Amy Grace
Rosalia WA
USA
3107 Posts

Posted - Jul 09 2010 :  7:26:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yeah Heather I think you are right - I have had a heck of a time hiring young people lately ( and the work I hire for is pretty cush). There is a definite lack of work ethic and common sense these days - there are definitely exceptions but there is also a big sense of entitlement amongst alot of people. too much easy money I guess.
Amy Grace

Farmgirl #224
"use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without"
Go to Top of Page

Claude09647
True Blue Farmgirl

761 Posts

Claudia
Our Dairy Farm Pennsylvania
USA
761 Posts

Posted - Jul 09 2010 :  9:59:14 PM  Show Profile  Send Claude09647 an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Something we don't have where i live are seamstresses. To get anything altered we have to drive about an hour or so. For my sisters wedding we had to drive almost two hours just to find someone that made a cake with fondant. A lot of the people that get married around here just wear and off he rack dress and get a sheet cake from Wal-mart because its too hard and too long of a drive just for those few things. I'd love to open up a bakery here. But just don't know if i'd be able to make it. Those are only a few things that i can think of. I will say though that we have a little wee glass shop that is called "Vintage Art Glass" and she makes hand blown glass and anything you can think of about of glass. She even offers classes. So i can at least boast about that! And she's one of the very few stores around here that is cash only. She usually knows your name when you walk in, and tries to make you feel very at home when your in her shop. Thats the way i wish our town still was. Unlike when you go into walmart you have a bunch of people there that don't want to be there and are not afraid to let you know that they don't want to be there too.

http://claude09647.blogspot.com/

Check out my ETSY store too! I'm loving it!
http://www.etsy.com/shop/Claudiascraftshop
Go to Top of Page

pseaton
Farmgirl at Heart

1 Posts

Patricia
Cottonwood California
USA
1 Posts

Posted - Jul 09 2010 :  10:40:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For my husband's birthday, I had his hand-me-down recliner reupholstered by a local upholstering craftsman. The chair has very nice lines, the mechanism works great, the material was just old and badly stained. The craftsman works out of a shop on his property. Not only is the chair now newly beautiful, refurbished, but I can't tell you how good it felt to do things this way. It wasn't cheap but I want to keep folks like this very nice and skilled man in the business of giving older but sturdier pieces of furniture new life.
Go to Top of Page

graciegreeneyes
True Blue Farmgirl

3107 Posts

Amy Grace
Rosalia WA
USA
3107 Posts

Posted - Jul 10 2010 :  3:50:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's a cool thing Patricia - welcome and thanks for sharing it!!
Amy Grace

Farmgirl #224
"use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without"
Go to Top of Page

MagnoliaWhisper
True Blue Farmgirl

2817 Posts

Heather
Haysville Kansas
USA
2817 Posts

Posted - Jul 10 2010 :  4:28:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Isn't that the truth Claudia.

One time I got to Walmart 30 minutes before closing (yes they close where I live!). And all I wanted to do was check on the price of a radio. I knew exactly where I was going and what I wanted.

I was stopped no less then 10 times on my way to the electronics, Miss, Miss, MISS! Me: Yes? Clerk: We're closing in 30 minutes. Me: ok, I'm just checking on something.

Clerk#10!: We're closing in 15 minutes.
Me: Yeah the other 9 clerks already told me, I would of already been out of here if you all would stop, stopping me to tell me you are closing!

Meanwhile, a countdown was over the speaker system about closing too!

I about never went back again! But, sadly there's not much alternatives where I live.


http://www.heathersprairie.blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page

Faransgirl
True Blue Farmgirl

895 Posts

Beth
Houston Texas
USA
895 Posts

Posted - Jul 11 2010 :  7:27:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree there is no work ethic anymore, but having three teenage daughters and the resulting boyfriends I do believe that they would do the work. The ones I know anyway. There is way to much easy money out there for those who want it. But for those of us that have worked all our lives and paid into the system it is impossible to get assistance. It is only there for those who have hardly worked like the single, illegal alien mother in Florida with 6 anchor babies and one more on the way. But, my daughters who have all been working since they were 16 can't get any help even thought they had lost their jobs due to the economy. Now there may be the reason for lack of work ethic. Why work if you can have everything handed to you.

Farmgirl Sister 572

When manure happens just say "WOO HOO Fertilizer".
Go to Top of Page

JenniferJuniper
True Blue Farmgirl

359 Posts

Jennifer
New Hampshire
USA
359 Posts

Posted - Jul 13 2010 :  05:31:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Turning back now to the spirit of the original post.....does anyone know or have teenagers or young 20-somethings who have ever said they wanted to go into one of the endangered professions? Any career counsellors on the board who can give us some insight?

The neighbors had a chimney sweep out yesterday, which made me smile & hum the theme from Fiddler on the Roof all afternoon. Another vital service that needs done - not glamorous - but our homes and very lives depend on it. Also am reminded of a Yankee Magazine article a few years back about witch hazel & how there is just a small handful of people who still gather it (it is wild, not cultivated) for commercial production & the implications of if no one steps in to fill their shoes.

Heather/Grace - My mom & her siblings used to pick cotton in the summer in the 50's & 60s for summer jobs back in AR. She said it was the hardest work she has ever done.

Farmgirl Sister #204
Go to Top of Page

Lida
True Blue Farmgirl

157 Posts

Lida
Rochester NY
USA
157 Posts

Posted - Jul 14 2010 :  1:32:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sewing machine repair- there is a business owner here who for years accepted apprentices to teach them the trade of sewing machine repair. Now he has trouble finding young people interested in learning the trade.

Lida
Go to Top of Page

JojoNH
True Blue Farmgirl

1963 Posts

Joanna
Dunbarton New Hampshire
USA
1963 Posts

Posted - Jul 19 2010 :  05:57:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a great post, as many have already said, Professional Seamstress. . . and your right about the pay, however that is not why we are doing it. . it's like a calling to keep the "local seamstress" tradition alive and hopefully to pass it on to the next person.

Joanna #566
"Keeping Traditions Alive A Stitch At A Time"
JojoNH
http://www.etsy.com/shop/CountryCents
http://CountryCents.Blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 5 Book Ideas: Previous Topic Endangered Arts & Professions Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Snitz Forums 2000 Go To Top Of Page