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ManyLeaves
Farmgirl in Training

10 Posts

Susan
WA
10 Posts

Posted - Jun 12 2020 :  10:54:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Research one classical composer and one musician from the last 100 years. Compare and contrast each.

I first noticed my two composers many years ago when I was researching music for a second level dressage musical freestyle - a dance of horse and rider to music. They are Sir Karl Jenkins and Antonio Vivaldi. Composers 300 years apart, but with each with a composition that blended perfectly with the other. Each with a very similar beginning in life.

Antonio Vivaldi was born in Venice Italy in 1678. The son of a professional violinist, who taught his son to play, toured Italy with him at a very early age. His father was one of the founders of Sovvegno dei musicisti di Santa Ceclia – an association of musicians in Italy. Vivaldi was a composer in the Baroque era. His most famous compositions are the four violin Concertos known as the Four Seasons. He was ordained as a Roman Catholic priest, however he was given a dispensation from celebrating Mass, so was withdrawn from his liturgical duties. He was also a virtuoso violinist. The Four Seasons are four concertos that reflect the four seasons of the year. The music represents flowing creeks, birds singing, storm, icy landscapes, etc. Each concerto is associated with a sonnet describing the season depicted in the music. They were published in 1725 in a collection of 12 concertos, Il ciento dell’armonia e dell’invtione, Opus 8. He also wrote many operas, but it is for his concertos that he was and still is well known. At the height of his career he was knighted by Emperor Charles VI. After Charles VI died he was left without funds or protection. He died impoverished in 1741.
It is the first movement of his Concerto No 4 in F minor, Op 8, RV297m “Winter (L’inverno) Allegro non molto that first piqued my interest.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxYpM8dpPVI

It is a very dramatic piece, full of soft pianissimos that crescendo to fortissimo, then back down again. The music is very regular, but full of contrasts. It’s associated sonnet is thought to possibly be written by Vivaldi himself:
Allegro non molto
"Aggiacciato tremar trŕ neri algenti
Al Severo Spirar d' orrido Vento,
Correr battendo i piedi ogni momento;
E pel Soverchio gel batter i denti;"
Allegro non molto
Shivering, frozen mid the frosty snow in biting, stinging winds;
Running to and fro to stamp one's icy feet, teeth chattering in the bitter chill.

Sir Karl William Pamp Jenkins was born in Penclawdd, Gower, Wales in 1944. His father was a local school teacher, chapel organist and choirmaster. He studied music at Cardiff University, and the Royal Academy of Music. His career was extremely varied as is his music. Has has played in the rock band Soft Machine. He also played in a new age music group called Adiemus. He has composed choral works, classical religious music, jazz and new age music. He is well know for writing advertising music. He holds a Doctorate of Music from the University of Wales. In 2015 he was made a Knight Bachelor. So his beginnings and career is a modern version of Vivaldi’s.

It is the music that he wrote for the DeBeer’s Diamonds commercials that caught my interest.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vXHm8TzLzE

The music could have been written 300 years ago by Vivaldi! So after some searching I found the album. Sir Karl took the commercial music and expanded it into Palladio, a three movement Concerto Grosso for Strings. The Diamond music is the first movement Allegretto. He said it was inspired by the sixteenth century Italian architect Andrea Palladio – his buildings known for their harmony and order.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6vCVGSCl74

Both of these compositions have soft beginnings, gradually building into a big, full sound, then back down again. Both endings are bold and very “forte”. They both are concertos for strings, and are usually played by a full string orchestra. Both composers wrote music that was varied, and of different genres for their time. The phrasing of Sir Karl’s composition is just slightly more flowing than Vivaldi’s – just a hint more “modern”.

When blended into music for a dressage freestyle, the two pieces blended into one another with very little editing needed. Jenkin’s music for the trot, Vivaldi’s for the canter and walk. In the dressage freestyle the music is to match the tempo of the horse’s gates. These matched my horse’s walk, trot and canter perfectly.
Both written in 4/4 time. Both beginning with a very regular, basic beat underlying the melody. Both for strings.

Palladio


Vivaldi

YellowRose
True Blue Farmgirl

5457 Posts

Sara
Paris TX
USA
5457 Posts

Posted - Jun 13 2020 :  04:16:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Susan I enjoyed reading about the two composers. Well done!

Sara~~~ FarmGirl Sister #6034 8/25/14
FarmGirl of the Month Sept 2015. & Feb 2019

Lord put your arm around my shoulders and your hand over my mouth.

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Red Tractor Girl
True Blue Farmgirl

4932 Posts

Winnie
Gainesville Fl
USA
4932 Posts

Posted - Jun 13 2020 :  1:20:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Susan , your research is quite interesting. Thank-you for sharing!

Winnie #3109
Red Tractor Girl
Farm Sister of the Year 2014-2015
FGOTM- October 2018
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MaryJanesNiece
True Blue Farmgirl

4218 Posts

Krista
Utah
USA
4218 Posts

Posted - Jun 15 2020 :  1:07:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you for sharing, Susan. Have you and your horse preformed this piece yet?

Krista
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Tchr66
True Blue Farmgirl

313 Posts

Terri
Clarington Ohio
USA
313 Posts

Posted - Jun 15 2020 :  3:26:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think it would be nice to see the performance. Any chance you are on Youtube or Faceboof for us to see?

As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord
Joshua 24:15
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ManyLeaves
Farmgirl in Training

10 Posts

Susan
WA
10 Posts

Posted - Jun 16 2020 :  11:18:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Unfortunately I was unable to get anyone to tape the class I rode in at that competition.
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katmom
True Blue Farmgirl

14317 Posts

Grace
WACAL Gal WashCalif.
USA
14317 Posts

Posted - Jun 25 2020 :  9:59:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Susan,, wowzers!
I have a couple of CD's of Vivaldi.. but had no knowledge of his background..


>^..^<
Happiness is being a katmom and Glamping Diva!

www.katmom4.blogspot.com & http://graciesvictorianrose.blogspot.com

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AussieChick
Farmgirl at Heart

7 Posts

Cindy
Ravensbourne QLD
Australia
7 Posts

Posted - Oct 23 2020 :  9:42:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi there - I, too, have been working on my intermediate music badge. I chose to research the classical composer, Frederic Chopin, and world renowned pianist, Richard Clayderman.

Richard Clayderman (born Philippe Pages in Paris in 1953) took his stage name from his Swedish great-grandmother as it was easier to pronounce in other languages. He is often referred to as "The Prince of Hearts & Romance". According to the Guinness Book of World Records, he is "the most successful pianist in the world". In a review of his 1985 Carnegie Hall concert, Variety wrote, "Clayderman's main appeal lies in his youth and boyish good looks... coupled with his gentlemanly charm and thick French accent, they promise to rope in the romantically inclined, middle-aged Yank ladies who cotton to this ilk of soothing entertainment". Coached in classical piano by his piano and music teacher Father, Clayderman enrolled in the Paris Conservatory of music at the age of 12. He was unable to complete his studies, however, because his father became terribly ill with kidney disease. Instead, he earned a living by accompanying other performers. He won an audition and was offered the opportunity to make a recording of "Ballad Pour Adeline" which rose him to instant fame. He has gone on to play in over 3000 concerts in about 70 countries. Clayderman states "I admire people who have the ability to remain humble, who do not boast, and who are able to speak about their career and success with humility. One of Clayderman's favourite composers to study was Frederic Chopin.

Chopin was a Polish composer (born in 1810) and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He also started at an early age, composing his first piece at the age of 7. He also was known world wide as a leading musician of his era. He had completed his musical education and composed most of his earlier works by age 20. He only gave approx 30 public performances, preferring the more intimate atmosphere of the salon. All of Chopin's compositions include the piano. Most are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces, and some 19 songs set to Polish lyrics. His piano writing was technically demanding and expanded the limits of the instrument, his own performances noted for their nuance and sensitivity. His major piano works also include mazurkas, waltzes, nocturnes, polonaises, the instrumental ballade (which Chopin created as an instrumental genre), études, impromptus, scherzos, preludes and sonatas, some published only posthumously. Among the influences on his style of composition were Polish folk music, the classical tradition of J. S. Bach, Mozart, and Schubert, and the atmosphere of the Paris salons of which he was a frequent guest. His innovations in style, harmony, and musical form, and his association of music with nationalism, were influential throughout and after the late Romantic period.

Both of these brilliant, humble pianists chose the Romantic style. Chopin was said to be the founder of the classical music style of the Ballade. Since the late 18th century, the term has meant a setting of a literary ballad, a narrative poem, in the musical tradition of the Lied, or to a one-movement instrumental piece with lyrical and dramatic narrative qualities reminiscent of such a song setting, especially a piano ballad.

Since Covid-19 has kept us more at home, I have been getting back into my piano playing and have purchased some new music to get inspired. Among these new purchases is Richard Clayderman's "Ballad Pour Adeline". If you aren't familiar with this song already, you must have a listen. Another of his great works is "Lady Di" which is an absolute joy to play.
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MaryJanesNiece
True Blue Farmgirl

4218 Posts

Krista
Utah
USA
4218 Posts

Posted - Oct 26 2020 :  12:47:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cindy, thank you for sharing! It’s lovely to hear that you are back into piano playing. Congratulations on finishing your intermediate music badge!

Krista
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