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Author Merit Badge Awardees - Woo-hoo Sisters!:  Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge Awardees 
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 05 2018 :  09:27:54 AM  Show Profile
Bette Axiak (#4157) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Intermediate Level Shopping Green Merit Badge!

I find that more and more I look at the packaging of products I purchase on a routine basis for my home use. I finally figured out that I need to use recyclable/biodegradable products as much as I can to not only save the environment, but my septic system. I use biodegradable toilet paper that is used exclusively with a septic system. I am also using the dish cleanser that has the Dutch girl on the container. In the place of paper napkins, I now use cloth. I also have purchased ingredients to make my own laundry soap. And, I have a clothes line outside for drying my laundry.

My clothes are just as clean as before, and now have the additional smell of having been blown in the wind. I am still using my drier on rainy days and sometimes for my towels and rugs.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 06 2018 :  09:57:34 AM  Show Profile
Bette Axiak (#4157) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Expert Level Self-Sufficiency Merit Badge!

I have my own dehydrator and have preserved several different fruits, vegetables, and herbs. I am a Master Food Preserver here in Tuolumne county and have presented at Master Food Preservers public classes, and at Open Garden Days at my Master Gardener Demonstration Garden.

I have found that dehydrating and preserving food is still beneficial for me even though my family is now grown. The benefits I enjoy from my preserving is that I have a jar/container ready to serve a meal for myself, bring to a pot luck, I eat healthier and cheaper, and am able to share a meal with a family in need. I have presented several times and have been well received. I am hoping to present to my co-workers on a lunch hour as they appear to be quite interested in the subject matter. My philosophy is keep on canning/preserving as everyone benefits including animals.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 06 2018 :  09:59:55 AM  Show Profile
Bette Axiak (#4157) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Get It Together Merit Badge!

I have lived in my small trailer for approximately 5 years now and it was time to clean out/organize my containers that I use to transport my lunches in. If the lid is reusable, I can use them as a saucer under my houseplants.

My small kitchen now only contains those containers that I can actually use and it left space for other necessary kitchen items. In addition, all my usable containers are grouped together.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 06 2018 :  10:00:39 AM  Show Profile
Bette Axiak (#4157) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Intermediate Level Get It Together Merit Badge!

My kitchen is efficient as I clean or toss out items periodically. The items that I am no longer using, ALWAYS go to a local charity. If I find I need something different for my kitchen two things are taken under consideration. First, do I really need it, and second how often will I use it.

This method has worked well for me as my living space is quite small (1973 travel trailer), and I continue to have what I need to prepare meals.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 06 2018 :  10:15:43 AM  Show Profile
Linda Bowlby (#7595) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Aprons Merit Badge!

I picked a Simplicity pattern and purchased fabric, thread and bias tape. The fabric has pink flamingos all over. It took about 4 1/2 hours. It has a gathered waistband and a very large pocket all around divided into sections. I will give it to a young friend who is undergoing a lot of family stress.

I think it turned out just adorable! I had a little trouble with the angled tie ends - but did a good job even so.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 06 2018 :  10:16:21 AM  Show Profile
Linda Bowlby (#7595) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Sew Wonderful Merit Badge!

I created a beginner's sewing kit for my daughter who lives in Austin TX. I included all the listed items: threads, buttons, scissors, needles, straight pins, safety pins(3 kinds!). I made a pinkeeper/needlecase from an Indigo Junction pattern using a cat print (we both love cats). The pattern is a basic flower shape which then has a felt insert. When the 4 crisscross rows of stitching are done, the finished case folds into a heart shape. The cats are bright primary colors. I put everything in a makeup bag and it is ready to be mailed.

It turned out adorable! I was very careful to keep the cats going all the same way with one "fussy" located on the front of the heart when it is closed. I am thrilled with the project and heart-warmed to provide this for my #1 daughter.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 06 2018 :  10:18:39 AM  Show Profile
Linda Bowlby (#7595) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a Beginner Level Speak for the Trees Merit Badge!

As a former Forester's wife and avid hiker, I already have tree identification books. Among the many trees on our farm I have identified Osage-Orange (native to my area), Eastern White Pine (native to my area), and Chinese Elm (introduced). Trees are an important element on our 5 acre farmstead and in our lives. I remember helping my husband study when he was in college to learn all the Latin names!

Well, this was fun to learn which was native and so on. It has helped me not to take all these beautiful creations for granted as I look out any of my windows.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 06 2018 :  10:33:26 AM  Show Profile
Hilary Syddall (#6958) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Bibliophile Badging Merit Badge!

If you don't have one already, sign up for a library card. - I already have a library card and use it regularly.

Start your TBR pile. (That's "to be read" if you're a newbie bookworm.) Take a picture of your pile and share it on social media or the Farmgirl Connection chatroom. - I posted a picture of my Kindle TBR pile and read three books from it already!

I enjoyed this badge very much!



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 09 2018 :  09:52:11 AM  Show Profile
Teresa Roberson (carolinacateyes #7386) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level My Fair Farmgirl Merit Badge!

I started this journey in January 2018! My best friend was introduced to essential oils and like everything she does, she became obsessive! Not satisfied with just listening, I started my own research. As an asthmatic, many chemicals, including perfumes, have been removed from my environment for years. Nevertheless, I became concerned about cosmetics I used on my face.

Ive learned a lot about the cosmetic industry I didnt know. Only 11% of ingredients are tested for safety! Artificial fragrances are often made from petroleum or coal or from cheap synthetic chemicals to replicate what exists in nature. I could go on and on. But, I also learned that without the chemical preservatives in store-bought products, homemade beauty products can develop bacteria. Now that I am making my own beauty products (more on that later), I make sure containers are sterile, and antioxidants and/or anti-microbials are added to the recipe if possible. I work in small batches. I have learned some things just need to refrigerated.

My first project was making bath salts using Epsom salts, baking powder, a small amount of coconut oil, and lavender essential oil. I mixed everything together and stored it in an airtight container in my bathroom linen closet. I use about a fourth cup per bath at least twice a week at night. It relaxes and soothes my muscles after a long day at work, and the lavender scent relaxes my mind! I also cut this recipe in half to create a new batch, using argan oil and geranium essential oil. I love the rose scent of geranium! My next small to-do project will be to make an invigorating bath bomb to use for my morning shower.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 09 2018 :  09:54:12 AM  Show Profile
Teresa Roberson (carolinacateyes #7386) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Intermediate Level My Fair Farmgirl Merit Badge!

Im hooked on essential oils and making homemade products. I am constantly reading and printing out products I want to try. I found a recipe online for Bath Bombs using aluminum-free baking soda, citric acid, Epsom salt, cornstarch, witch hazel with aloe vera (no alcohol), argan oil, pure clear vanilla extract, and essential oils. I ordered items from Amazon so I could start this project on a weekend.

After mixing the dry ingredients together, I divided the mixture in half in a separate glass bowl. I did the same with the liquids minus the essential oils. In one half, I added Lemon essential oil. The other half liquid I added Eucalyptus oil. Mixing the dry and liquids together was a lot like making play dough. The right consistency is important to hold the bombs together without falling apart, not an easy task. I then pressed each ball into a small, greased muffin pan and left the pan on the dining room table to harden for a couple of days.

To my surprise, the bombs turned out fairly well. I had a problem getting a few out but I just added those to bath water. I use one ball in a mesh bag I hang underneath the shower head. The next time I make the bombs, I will create one batch at a time. Much like any recipe, it takes trial and error! I think it is important to measure all the ingredients correctly. I will continue to make these periodically so I can perfect the technique. Id like to sell these at the church bazaar in the fall. My next projects are cuticle cream, body spray repellent for the outdoors, colored lip balm! Fun,fun, fun!

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 09 2018 :  10:28:57 AM  Show Profile
Cyrie Wilson (Pixiedustdevil #6941) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an Expert Level Homespun Christmas Merit Badge!

For Christmas I made:
A Wonder Woman pillow and pillowcase for one of my friends.
Orange scented bath salts and 2 pot holders for my stepmother.
A wrist pin cushion for my sister.

My Christmas tree is decorated with traditional ornaments every year, so instead of making ornaments for my tree, I tatted snowflakes and included them in my Christmas cards.

I learned that adding white glitter to the tatted snowflakes, while starching them, makes them gorgeous! The people who got them loved them! My friend LOVED the Wonder Woman pillow.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 09 2018 :  10:30:59 AM  Show Profile
Cyrie Wilson (Pixiedustdevil #6941) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner and Intermediate Level Bibliophile Badging Merit Badge!

I renewed my library card for the year.
I have included a picture of books that are at the top of my reading pile; I have way more books to read than this!

As for starting a book club; my friends and I have a sort of book share going. Instead of a book club, we share all of our books and magazines. In my case; I get MaryJanes Farm every month, after I read it I lend it to one friend, when I get it back it goes to the next person. As for prizes/ goodie bags; we usually exchange things when passing on the books/ magazines, such as food, recipes, fabric, and such.

I have all of the MaryJane books, and after lending them to a friend, she joined the Sisterhood.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 09 2018 :  10:50:07 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Malone (FarnGirlJoy #7605) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Knitting Merit Badge!

I have knitted off and on for about 10 years. I mostly knit dishcloths because you don't have to concentrate too much and they make great gifts for family and other farm girls! You really can never have too many. It takes me about 2 hours to knit a dishcloth, so for this badge I knit 2 dishcloths. A dear friend of mine stayed the weekend recently and we sat down to drink tea, chat, watch chick flicks, and decided to keep our hands busy with knitting. My friend, Pam, had knitted in the distant past, but couldn't really remember how to make a dishcloth. We worked together over the course of the weekend with lots of mentoring and laughing (and reworking dropped stitches).

At the end of my girl's weekend with Pam, she had a useful and semi-holey dishcloth to take home with her, as well as renewed knowledge and confidence to start knitting again. I ended up with a full heart and 2 dishcloths to put up for future gifts.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 09 2018 :  10:51:17 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Malone (FarnGirlJoy #7605) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Shopping Green Merit Badge!

While I have used reusable shopping bags from time to time, especially at ALDI where they charge you for bags, I have decided to make a commitment to use reusable bags for all of my planned shopping needs. I also now keep 2 bags in the back of my jeep all the time so that I have them should I need to stop for something on the way home from work. Here's to saving the environment from all those plastic bags!

So far so good - my husband does a good bit of the grocery shopping and he has been doing well at taking bags with him. I have used the bags in my jeep a couple of times for those impromptu store stops. It feels pretty good to be less wasteful and more environmentally friendly.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 09 2018 :  10:51:55 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Malone (FarnGirlJoy #7605) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Forage for Food Merit Badge!

In researching foraging for wild edibles I accessed my county's extension office website which has a plethora of information as well as a link to educational materials through the Purdue extension. Unfortunately there was no information whatsoever about wild edibles. Information about foraging only dealt with identification of different types of weeds and grasses for agriculture. My library has a book called The Quick Guide to Wild Edible Plants by Lytton John Musselman and Harold J. Wiggins. While not specific to my area, this book contains good general information which will be very useful for my husband and I as we forage for wild edibles this year.

My husband and I are making plans to glean as many wild edibles as we can this year. We will start with mushroom hunting next month for morels, and move to berries this summer, followed by persimmons this fall.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2018 :  10:13:05 AM  Show Profile
Deborah Meyer (dmeyer #4099) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a Beginner Level Fishing Merit Badge!

I practiced making knots used in fishing. I made the following knots: clinch, palomar, turle, barrel, and the double surgeons loop.

Here are the instructions I found to make the knots.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2018 :  10:14:52 AM  Show Profile
Deborah Meyer (dmeyer #4099) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning an Intermediate Level Fishing Merit Badge!

I went online and read the Missouri Fishing Regulations booklet. I found out the following fish are caught regularly in Missouri: sunfish, gar, catfish, rainbow trout, bass, carp, and crappie.

I found that earthworms, minnows, crickets, grasshoppers, dough bait and stink bait are commonly used as bait when fishing besides lures.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2018 :  10:15:58 AM  Show Profile
Deborah Meyer (dmeyer #4099) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a Beginner Level Wild Game Merit Badge!

I researched the different types of wild game in my area. We have turkey, deer, quail, dove, duck, geese, and rabbit as a few. I read the online Hunting Regulation handbook to get some good information. I found information on handling wild game meat. It is as follows:

Care in the Field
Be Prepared for the Hunt: Remember to bring a sharp hunting knife, a small hatchet, a whetstone or steel, about 12 feet of light rope or nylon cord, plastic bags, and clean cloths or paper towels. Other essentials include proper clothing, binoculars, a canteen of fresh water, a compass, a map and matches. In warm weather you may want to bring a can of ground pepper and some cheesecloth. The carcass may be sprinkled with pepper and covered with cheesecloth to repel flies.

Bleeding the Animal: Usually it is not necessary to bleed the animal, because the bullet or arrow has caused enough damage to the animal to bleed it sufficiently. However, if the animal is shot in the head it will need to be bled. If you think the deer needs additional bleeding, field dress the deer, then cut the main artery next to the backbone.

If the animal is a trophy buck that you plan to mount, do not sever its throat, because this will cause problems during mounting."

Field Dressing: There are three major rules to follow as soon as the animal is dead.

Remove the intestines, lungs, liver and heart as soon after the kill as possible. Keep the carcass clean by getting it off the ground as quickly as possible and by using clean utensils during dressing. Cool the carcass quickly and keep it cool during processing and transport.
When field dressing an animal, plastic surgical gloves are recommended. Clean your hunting knife often with clean water and a cloth to prevent contamination of the meat.

Place the animal on its back with the front-end elevated and spread the hind legs. Support the carcass in position by placing rocks or sticks on each side. Cut along the midline of the belly from the breastbone to the anus. Avoid cutting into the paunch and intestines by using the handle of the knife and the heel of your hand to crowd the guts away. Cut around the anus, loosening the bung so it will come out with the guts.

Cut the diaphragm (the thin sheet of muscle and connective tissue between the chest and the abdomen) free from the rib cage by cutting through the white tissue near the rib cage.
Reach forward to cut the windpipe, gullet and blood vessels at the base of the throat. Pull the lungs, heart and guts out of the animal. If you like variety meats, save the heart and liver in a plastic bag and put on ice.
Hanging to Drain & Clean: Put the carcass on logs or rocks if it cannot be hung. Remove all foreign particles and loose hair. Wipe out excess blood in gutted cavity with a paper towel or clean cloth and clean water.
Use as little water as possible, because damp meat spoils faster than dry meat. Dry with paper towels or clean rags. Prop the cavity open with sharpened sticks and hang the carcass in the shade until the cavity surface is thoroughly dry. Be sure there is good air circulation. Do not use grass or snow to wipe out the carcass, because this may contaminate the carcass.

Chilling: Improper temperature is meat's worst enemy. The surface of the carcass may be contaminated with bacteria that can spoil the meat unless chilling stops the growth. During warm hunting seasons special care should be taken to keep the carcass cool. It should be kept in the shade and allowed as much air circulation as possible. Refrigerate the deer carcass as soon as possible for best quality. If the weather is over 40 F, it is strongly recommended that the carcass be taken to a cooler the day of the kill. If the air temperature is above 50 F as it often is in South Carolina, the deer carcass should be refrigerated within three to four hours after killing. Cool the animal quickly. Cool the carcass by propping the chest open with a clean stick and allowing air to circulate. Filling the cavity with bags of ice will also enhance cooling. To aid cooling in warm weather, the animal may be skinned if you have provisions to keep the carcass clean. Use ground pepper and cheesecloth or light cotton bags to protect the skinned carcass from contamination by flies. Do not use airtight game-bags or tarps that hold in heat and will cause meat to spoil rapidly. In cool weather (28 to 35 F), wrap the carcass or quarters in a sheet and hang to chill in a ventilated shed. Do not allow the carcass to freeze. Freezing may toughen the meat.

Transporting:
Keep the carcass cool during transport. Do not tie a deer carcass on the hood of the car or in the trunk when it is still warm. Be sure to keep the carcass cool until it reaches the locker plant. Keep the carcass out of direct sunlight and allow for adequate air circulation. Aging Meat: Aging meat is the practice of holding carcasses or cuts of meat at temperatures of 34 to 37 F for 7 to 14 days to allow the enzymes in the meat to break down some of the complex proteins in the carcass. Aged meat is often more tender and flavorful. Do not age any game carcass if it was shot during warm weather and not chilled rapidly, if the animal was severely stressed prior to the kill, if gunshot areas are extensive, or if the animal was under 1 year of age. Aging is not recommended for carcasses with little or no fat covering because they may dry out during aging, and are more susceptible to deterioration through microbial growth. If the meat will be ground into sausage, aging is unnecessary. Leave the hide on and maintain the proper temperature when aging a carcass. Aging game that has been skinned often results in drying and high weight loss. For this reason, properly chilled game should be aged with the hide on unless it is to be aged in a cooler where humidity is high. If you do not have the proper cooler space, spoilage or dehydration may result. Do not trim fat from game meat before it is aged because the fat protects the meat. However, fat should be trimmed after aging to avoid undesirable flavors associated with the fat. Limit aging to a maximum of two weeks at 34 to 37 F. At this point tenderization slows down, and bacterial slime develops which then must be trimmed. Cold shortening, which causes meat to be tough, occurs if the internal muscle temperature drops to 32 F within 12 hours after the kill, such as if carcasses under 100 pounds are slaughtered when the temperature is below freezing. Frozen carcasses should be thawed and aged at 34 F for 14 days.

Cutting:
Many freezer locker stores have power saws and capable meat cutters who cut and wrap meat. Some hunters cut their own roasts and have steaks or chops cut by an expert meat cutter. Cutting is not a haphazard operation. For easy cutting, hang the carcass by the hocks or hock tendons. Split lengthwise along the backbone from tail to neck, saw with a meat or carpenter 's saw, or chop with a cleaver or hand ax. Keep halves well spread while splitting. Cut between the last two ribs and through the backbone to divide halves into quarters. The simplest way to cut meat is to remove all flesh from bones following along natural seams of muscles. Loins are removed from the back as they lie between the upright vertebra and down-turned ribs. The long, sausage-shaped piece can then be trimmed of loose tissue and cut into steak-sized pieces (similar to cutting a loaf of bread). On smaller animals, a cut twice the desired size is made, then cut almost in two again, leaving connective tissue enough to fold out the cuts to resemble a butterfly.

Care in the Kitchen
Wild game provides wholesome, nourishing food, but should be preserved carefully to retain quality. Like domestic meat, wild meat is perishable, so care is needed to maintain its quality. Freezing meat is the most accepted way to maintain top quality. Keep raw meat and cooked meat separate to prevent cross-contamination. Wash your knife, hands and cutting board often with warm, soapy water. Trim fat and inedible parts from the carcass when it is cut.
Mix 15% pork or beef fat with ground game and 35% pork fat with fresh game sausage.

To Store in Refrigerator for Immediate Use:
Wrap the meat in moisture-proof plastic wrap or place in a clean plastic storage bag. Store the meat in the refrigerator and use within 2 or 3 days.

To Freeze Game Properly:
Freeze meat while it is fresh and in top condition. Divide meat into meal-size quantities. Prevent "freezer burn" by using good-quality freezer paper. Use moisture/vapor-proof wrap such as heavily waxed freezer wrap, laminated freezer wrap, heavy-duty aluminum foil or freezer-weight polyethylene bags. Press air out of the packages prior to sealing.
Label packages with contents and date.
Freeze and store at 0 F or lower.
Avoid overloading the freezer. Freeze only the amount that will become solidly frozen within 24 hours.
Avoid long storage periods. Limit fresh game to eight months frozen storage and seasoned or cured game to four months frozen storage. In most states hunting laws require that all wild game be used before the next hunting season. Check regulations for amount of game you can keep and length of time that you can keep it.
Other methods for preserving game meats include curing and smoking, drying, corning, canning and sausage making.

To Thaw Frozen Meat:
Thaw in the refrigerator or microwave oven. Game meat is often high in bacterial content. Thawing at room temperature enhances bacterial growth. Foods thawed in the microwave should be cooked immediately. Refrigerator-thawed meat should be used within one or two days.

Cooking Wild Game:
Game animals lead active lives. As a result, their muscles are relatively lean. This makes game meat drier than domestic meat or poultry. Therefore, it is important to use cooking methods that add juiciness and flavor to game meat.

Cooking Tips:
Trim away fat before cooking if this was not done when the game was cut. Wild game fat tends to become rancid quickly and this contributes to the "game" flavor. Add other fats to keep game meat from becoming too dry. Rub a roast with salt pork, butter, margarine, beef suet, bacon fat, vegetable fat, or sweet or sour cream to add moisture, richness and flavor.
"Lard" your lean game meat by inserting slivers of uncooked salt pork or bacon with a skewer or ice pick. If you make your own rolled roasts, add beef or pork fat to the inside and outside of the roast before it is tied. Baste very lean cuts with additional fat to improve flavor.
Serve game meat very hot or very cold. Lukewarm game fat has a very greasy taste.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 11 2018 :  09:38:53 AM  Show Profile
Amy Wilson (Pumpkinvine #119) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Recycling Merit Badge!

Our city offers co-mingled recycling. Their website has a good list of what can be put in your recycling bin:

glass bottles and jars (no lids), newspapers, magazines, catalogs, junk mail, envelopes, office paper, phone books, paper bags, cereal boxes, cardboard boxes (flattened), and paper egg cartons, plastics coded 1-7, plastic shopping bags (must be tied together), tin and aluminum cans, aluminum foil and metal trays, empty aerosol cans, empty and dry paint cans (remove lids), and metal lids/caps from jars and bottles.

We also have a green waste recycling bin for grass clippings, leaves, weeds, and small branches.

Looking at the city's website I noticed some things that we have been putting in our recycling and green waste containers that shouldn't be there, so this enabled me to make some positive changes, even though we have been recycling for years.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 11 2018 :  09:39:39 AM  Show Profile
Amy Wilson (Pumpkinvine #119) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Blogging Merit Badge!

I read Blogging for Creatives and came up with a theme for my blog. I want it to be a lifestyle blog, with sections about food, crafts, travel, books and gardening.

I enjoyed the book but was a little overwhelmed. Theres a lot more to blogging than I thought.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 11 2018 :  09:40:57 AM  Show Profile
Amy Wilson (Pumpkinvine #119) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Origami Merit Badge!

I researched the history of origami and this is what I found out:

History of Origami

When paper was introduced to Japan from China in the 6th century, paper folding was used for religious purposes only because it was so valuable. Between 1603 and 1868, it became a popular pastime. Once paper was mass-produced and less expensive, it took off as an art form. In 1797 the first written directions for origami were published.

In Europe in the 12th century, the Moors brought a form of mathematically based folding to Spain.

Origami today is both simple folding techniques passed down orally as well as complex mathematical patterns.

I made a cat, a five pointed star and a butterfly.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

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MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 11 2018 :  09:41:54 AM  Show Profile
Amy Wilson (Pumpkinvine #119) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Sew Wonderful Merit Badge!

I used a small bag I already had to create my sewing kit. It contains black and white thread, a needle threader, a seam ripper, some extra buttons, and a handmade felt pin-keep with needles, straight pins and safety pins.

I love how this turned out. Originally I wanted to make a sewing kit from a mason jar, but I think this is more portable and practical.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 12 2018 :  09:56:35 AM  Show Profile
Lenora McMahan (firecatinc #7131) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning an Intermediate Level Gaining Ground Merit Badge!

I have been working my compost pile since 3/1/17. I sifted my pile this week-end. I made 55 gal. of usable compost. I also have to give credit to my helpers, my hens have worked it with me.

I have written a letter to my newspaper about the benefits of starting a composting center.

I have gained a usable skill.



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 16 2018 :  09:52:57 AM  Show Profile
Joyce Hein (GinghamGirl #6071) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Bibliophile Badging Merit Badge!

I have a library card, and have enjoyed, particularly, the audio books that are accessible via this card.

My TBR pile includes: Von Trapp Family Singers (the inspiration for The Sound of Music) Created To Be His Help Meet (Debi Pearl), Big Red (Jim Kjelgaard), Felicity (AG Doll). I also have a Nova Scotia Gardening book I'm reading as PEI doesn't have one and I'm hoping this will help me in terms of gardening in our climate. I did finish all the books, except Von Trapp, which I'm almost done with. I will be adding more to the pile soon!

I always enjoy reading - but was encouraged to keep at it as sometimes it seems other things take precedence. The children and I have really enjoyed the audio books.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

13285 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
13285 Posts

Posted - Apr 16 2018 :  09:53:47 AM  Show Profile
Joyce Hein (GinghamGirl #6071) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an Intermediate Level Bibliophile Badging Merit Badge!

For the Intermediate Level, I've put up a contest in our Wildflower Group. I'm also part of a Charlotte Mason Book Club that meets once a month. I'm keeping my pile stacked high with new books - Home Creamery, Little House Living, and finishing up Von Trapp Family Singers.

I enjoyed putting together a box for the Wildflower who reads the most pages by April 30th. I wanted to join the MJF book club, but, unfortunately, I'm not on Facebook. I'm thankful for the one I can be part of though!

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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